Radiometric dating a christian perspective by dr roger c wiens

As Weins puts it: As the rock starts to age, rubidium gets converted to strontium.The amount of strontium added to each mineral is proportional to the amount of rubidium present.There are now well over forty different radiometric dating techniques, each based on a different radioactive isotope.Most dating techniques involve multiple tests using different methods and on different minerals within a rock (isochrons).Atoms of a radioactive nuclide decays exponentially at a rate described by a parameter known as the half-life, usually given in units of years when discussing dating techniques.After one half-life has elapsed, one half of the atoms of the nuclide in question will have decayed into a “daughter” nuclide or decay product.

The top number, 3.60±0.05, refers to the range 3.60 0.05 to 3.60-0.05.All ordinary matter is made up of combinations of chemical elements, each with its own atomic number, indicating the number of protons in the atomic nucleus.Additionally, elements may exist in different isotopes, with each isotope of an element differing in the number of neutrons in the nucleus.The size of this range is every bit as important as the actual number.A number with a small uncertainty range is more accurate than a number with a larger range. Copper ruins in Jordan bolster biblical record of King Solomon, Los Angeles Times, October 28, 2008. Creative Commons License If you don’t see your comment appear, please drop me an email. I don’t have time to go through the hundreds of comments that go into spam every day, but let me know and if it’s in spam I can do a quick search and set it free.

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